Churches

Discover a wealth of Romanesque, Early English, Decorated and Perpendicular styles.

Peterborough Cathedral

With its dramatic West Front entrance and magnificent interior, Peterborough is one of the finest Norman Cathedral’s in Europe. It’s 13th Century painted Nave ceiling which is unique in England. Henry VIII’s first wife, Katharine of Aragon, is buried here. It is the cathedral for the Peterborough Diocese, which includes Northamptonshire within its boundaries. Entry is free (donations invited; groups please book in advance).  

St. Mary and All Saints

Open all year. This famous Perpendicular style church is a small part of a once great Collegiate foundation dating from 1411. Striking features include the octagonal lantern tower, the two storey north porch and the pinnacles and flying buttresses along the length of the nave.

St. Peter’s Church, Irthlingborough

St. Peter's obtained a licence to become a collegiate church in the 1370's and the tower is linked to the main body of the church by the remains of the college building. Remarkably, the tower was taken down and carefully rebuilt identically between 1889 and 1893. Open all year round, Thursday and all day Sunday.

48 College Street, Irthlingborough, Wellingborough NN9 5TX
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St. Mary’s Church, Rushden

Open all year round with it's 172ft tower and spire, St Mary boasts a 14th century oak pulpit, one of only 35 left in England. Its strainer arch is also remarkable, one of the few examples of this architecture known in England.

St. Mary's Church, Higham Ferrers

St Mary's Church, Higham Ferrers is a parish church in the Church of England in Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire. It is a Grade I listed building.

All Saints Church, Easton on the Hill

An interesting and the earliest feature of this church is a 12th century window that can still be seen in a wall in the south arcade. The church was largely rebuilt in the 13th century and the south wall of the 12th century nave became part of the internal arcade. Open all year.

Church Street, Easton-on-the-Hill, Northamptonshire, PE9 3LL
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St. Peter's Church, Raunds

In the reign of Henry III the Church was probably a plain cruciform Norman one, and from this was built the inspiring church of today.  Built largely of local limestone in the Early English style, the rebuilding was started about 1220. Walking into church through the impressive south porch one’s eye is immediately caught by the unique 15th century wall paintings.  The series of paintings forms one of the most complete and important painted interiors in Northamptonshire, if not the whole country.